Call for Entry Submit your images to DCP's current call for entry Light. Selections will be featured in a virtual exhibition on the DCP website, in an in-person gallery exhibit in June, and an exhibition catalog. Submission deadline is April 27!

Articles Tagged: Dallas

Corporate Sponsor Spotlight: Red River Paper

In the digital age, most people view photographs on the screens of their devices. But there is something special about getting that image onto paper and displaying it on your wall, as a card or in a hand-bound book. There are a few choices for good, photo-quality printers, and any review roundup will point you in the right direction. Where the choices explode is in the selection of what paper you’re going to use. The weight, tone, surface and texture all affect how different photos will present themselves in the physical world. There are a dozen companies that sell hundreds of variations of paper. Dallas is fortunate to be the home of a company that offers the highest quality papers at prices that reduce printing budgets for all levels of photographers.

Red River Paper was founded by Richard Clampitt. Richard spent most of his life selling paper to print shops with Clampitt Paper Company. In 1996, he started Red River Paper with medical ultrasound paper. A year later, Drew Hendrix joined and both saw photographs printed on inkjet printers and decided to expand the paper selection to include inkjet photo paper. As inkjet technology has improved over the years, so has paper quality and selection. Red River Paper is now run by Drew Hendrix and carries 25 paper surfaces in various weights and sizes to meet the needs of today’s photographer.

WHAT SETS RRP APART:

Red River Paper manufactures paper by buying large bulk rolls from the top paper mills in the US, Japan, and Europe. They then sheet the paper and cut them down to the sizes they carry or create smaller rolls. RRP also scores all paper in house for their greeting card selection, and they sell everything directly to the customer to keep costs lower for the end user. They offer extensive inkjet printing support with their paper and more online tutorials than any of their competitors. Here is a video about what sets their photo paper apart: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3H5pGfGlhO4

STAFF FAVORITE PAPERS:

KAYLA (Customer Service) – 75lb. Arctic Polar Luster for landscapes

LESLIE (Marketing) – 68lb. UltraPro Satin for portrait photography and Palo Duro SoftGloss Rag for fine art photography

CINDY (Customer Service) – Both Polar Gloss Metallic and Polar Matte for landscapes and architectural images

DREW (President) – Palo Duro SoftGloss Rag for black and white landscapes as well as artistic infrared work

NEW TO PRINTING?

Red River Paper’s biggest piece of advice is to call them at 888-248-8774 if you are trying to figure out which inkjet printer to buy. They will help you find an ideal printer for your budget, paper preference, and space. They will also help you choose a paper or recommend a sample kit that will meet your needs.

HELPFUL LINKS:

Not sure which paper would be best for your landscape shot versus a traditional portrait? Shop paper by photography subject.

Cost per Print Analysis: What’s the true cost of inkjet printing.

Printer Reviews: Founded in 1997, Red River Paper has “been there and done that” in terms of digital image capture, editing, and output.

RRP equivalent paper chart

Preview of Really at Undermain Theatre

We were approached by Undermain Theatre about their new play, Really by Jackie Sibblies Drury. It uses photography as a main theme and they thought we might want to let our clients know about the play. So I went to the preview performance on April 14.

Photography does play a prominent role, in fact, it felt as if it were the fourth character in the play. The three actors are excellent and the story of their relationships is unveiled in a series of emotional interactions and moments. The handling of a camera, fidgeting with lights and talking about photography are woven throughout the drama, sometimes as just busy work, other times as punctuation to the dialog.

I think the play should be seen by anyone who has adopted photography as part of their lives. There is almost no technical dialog about the photographic process here. What the author has done is far more difficult and challenging. She has used photography as a way to explore the very nature of reality and truth. I left the theater in a bit of a fog, in a good way. As a photographer, I’m increasingly aware of my  lifelong attempts to freeze moments and control reality as well as the constant judgment of whether I am good enough. Those thoughts and emotions also apply to relationships. I think Really has done an intriguing job of weaving those two tendencies together.

Preview of the DMA’s Concentrations 60: Lucie Stahl

 

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This morning I had the pleasure of attending Dallas Museum of Art’s Press Preview for Concentrations 60: Lucie Stahl. I wasn’t sure what to expect from a scanner artist but it was close enough to photography that I wanted to know more.

Stahl uses a flatbed scanner to create large format images of items such as food, magazine clippings and trash. The results are fascinating and have a very tactile quality. I really enjoyed her image titled Identity which consisted of a Coca-Cola can, flowers, Lucie’s hands and some unknown liquid. Her method of coating the print in resin made it seem as though the strange red liquid was going to drip right off the wall onto the gallery floor. According to the DMA, “Stahl’s work plays with the notion of liquidity in its many forms – from finance to bodily fluids to the malleability of gender, identity, and images.”

Lucie Stahl Identity, 2015 Inkjet print, aluminum, epoxy resin

Lucie Stahl
Identity, 2015
Inkjet print, aluminum, epoxy resin

Creating art using scanners is actually a really fun and easy thing to do. The images you create can be blown up to huge proportions and are still very sharp. You can use flowers, household objects or even faces. Here’s a helpful how-to on scannography.

Even if you’re not ready to start scanning I certainly recommend checking out Concentrations 60: Lucie Stahl. The exhibit opens Friday, September 16, 2016 and runs until March 12, 2017. Admission is free. Visit the DMA website for complete details.

SMU Historical Aerial Photos

I recently discovered that Southern Methodist University here in Dallas (SMU) has a nice online collection of historical photographs. Included is a group of photos titles “Miscellaneous Aerial Views of Dallas, 1930s-1940s”. They are a fascinating look at our city in earlier decades. The one below is titled “Mid-Town Business District” from 1935 and has call outs for the major buildings.

You can find the SMU photo collection here. The site is well worth spending some time on!

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