Natural Light Portraits In honor of the release of our exhibition catalog The Human Portrait, we’re offering 20% off our popular Natural Lights Portrait workshop that has improved the skills of over 220 photographers since 2015. Sale ends March 3!

We hit the kilo-like mark on Facebook

The Hunt for the Scavenger Hunt Prize

One of the favorite aspects of my job as studio manager at DCP is that I am never quite sure how the day will pan out. The Tuesday before we had our first Kids Scavenger Hunt at Klyde Warren Park, I started my day with a text from Peter: “Hey, I need you to find little toy cameras that we can give to the kids as a completion prize. Check out the stores around Harry Hines Blvd and Royal Ln.”

Little did I know, this was the beginning of my own full blown scavenger hunt.

Peter had given me one clue: the Asian Trade District. Having just moved to Dallas, my familiarity with the area was on par with my knowledge of astrophysics (yes, I am aware of planets, but do I really know what is going on? no). I set off in my car, mentally braced for the journey ahead.

The stores were intense to say the least. They did not disappoint and reminded me of similar Chinatowns I’d visited on the East and West coast, but with that Dallas twist: plenty of parking and lots of space. The smell of plastic wafted through each store as I stared at rows upon rows of brightly colored plastic toys. I searched through the infinite bins but no toy cameras were found. I went to ten different shops but left empty handed, being told that they did not sell what I was trying to find.

The next day, on a hunch (and a little bit of desperation), I stopped by a little Korean shop in Plano by my house. I walked in and asked the shop keeper if he had toy cameras. He told me no but he knew where to get them! Excited, I asked him where. “Party City.” The quick drive confirmed that, sure enough, Party City had hundreds of small toy cameras all in different colors.
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A Cheap Leica

To my client who thinks I should own a Leica (you know who you are). Yesterday I bought this little gem from a thrift store in Maine for $5, case and working battery included. I didn’t even know that Leica had gotten into the pocket camera market all those years ago. The camera itself is unremarkable, what would have set this apart from similar offerings in the late 90s was the Leica Vario-Elmar 35-70mm, that and the $400 price tag!

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Ansel Adams Masterworks

There’s an Ansel Adams exhibit on at the Arlington Museum of Art running through August 3rd. As someone who grew up admiring his images, it was a thrill for me to be able to view 48 prints made in the darkroom by the photographer himself.

Unfortunately, that thrill was diminished by the way the photos were exhibited. The space felt like a high school gym and the lighting was poorly placed, resulting in reflections on the glazing of many of the prints. Still, it was wonderful to see the deep blacks of these silver gelatin prints and to stand in front of icons of photography, made by the photographer’s hand.

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A group shot of the May 2014 Noel Kerns Workshop

VIDEO PRODUCTION IN THE 70’S

After I graduated from UNT I worked as a video producer making short instructional films. For two years I was in the Special Ed department, working with some basic black and white video gear. Then I moved to the physics department for two years, where this photo was taken. They had color cameras and an actual 3/4″ tape to tape editing system. Pretty big stuff back then. This is me in a live switching segment, in my best director pose, fingers poised for action. Cameras one, two and three on wide, medium and closeups. Character generator ready to lay in some graphics. I think we were prepping a piece on basic circuits.

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My best tourist photo from Downton Abbey.

My wife and I are in England for a week. Two good things happened today: We got a surprise rental upgrade from a Volkswagen to a BMW and we got to visit Highclere Castle, AKA Downton Abbey. In my excitement to get a photo to post on FB I had my finger over the iPhone lens. I kind of like it.

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Blood Moon

Last night was the first blood moon of the year. I had to get up and see it but realized that I had forgotten all my Nikon gear at the studio. This was shot with a friend’s Leica V-Lux 4, a small, affordable camera (same as Panasonic FZ-200) with a lens that is the equivalent of 25-600mm, f2.8 all the way!

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I also forgot my tripod so instead was able to nestle the camera in a beanbag in the back yard and use the self timer to eliminate vibration. (Daylight photos are a recreation from the next day)

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Experimenting with the Fuji X100s

Today I took my own advice and spent the whole day shooting in Athens with the fixed focal length lens (35mm equivalent) on the Fuji X100s. I really liked it, even though it was tough at first not having my D600 and 24-120. I really liked the light weight and unobtrusiveness of the smaller Fuji.

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A group shot of the March 2014 Noel Kerns Workshop